X
<

What Microsoft's New Love for Linux Says about Open-Source Tech

PART:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
What Microsoft's New Love for Linux Says about Open-Source Tech PART 1 OF 10

Microsoft Frees Its SQL Server to Run on Linux

Microsoft announced SQL Server availability on Linux OS

The battle between Microsoft (MSFT) and Oracle (ORCL) in the database market continues to intensify. Recently, Microsoft made an important announcement about making its SQL Server database available on Linux OS (operating system) by mid-2017.

Before this announcement, the SQL Server database was available only on Windows OS. Scott Guthrie, Microsoft’s executive vice president, stated, “We are bringing the core relational database capabilities to preview today, and are targeting availability in mid-2017.”

Microsoft Frees Its SQL Server to Run on Linux

Interested in IBM? Don't miss the next report.

Receive e-mail alerts for new research on IBM

Success! You are now receiving e-mail alerts for new research. A temporary password for your new Market Realist account has been sent to your e-mail address.

Success! has been added to your Ticker Alerts.

Success! has been added to your Ticker Alerts. Subscriptions can be managed in your user profile.

Created in 1991, Linux is an OS that is free to use for everyone. SQL Server database is Microsoft’s enterprise database platform that stores, retrieves, and interprets huge information data sets.

Microsoft’s SQL server will only run on Linux

Microsoft is not making SQL Server’s code open source. It’s only making its SQL server run on Linux. According to a Cowen & Co. IT (information technology) spending survey in mid-2015, and as the above chart shows, database alternatives that were most evaluated when deploying new applications included Microsoft SQL Server (63%), Oracle (51%), SAP HANA (38%), and IBM DB2 (26%).

Later in the series, we’ll discuss how this news impacts Microsoft and the enterprise software space on a broader level.

You may want to consider investing in the PowerShares QQQ Trust, Series 1 ETF (QQQ) to gain exposure to Microsoft, which makes up 8.4% of QQQ. Investors who would like application software exposure could also consider this ETF. Application software makes up ~28.4% of QQQ.

X

Please select a profession that best describes you: