Scammers Are Using AI To Sell Fake Superbowl Tickets: Here's How To Be Safe

Scammers Are Using AI To Sell Fake Superbowl Tickets: Here's How To Be Safe
The Fountains of Bellagio launch behind a display of footballs with a Super Bowl LVIII logo | Getty Images | Photo by Ethan Miller

Travis Kelce #87 of the Kansas City Chiefs speaks to the media during Super Bowl LVIII Opening Night at Allegiant Stadium | Getty Images | Photo by Luke Hales
Travis Kelce #87 of the Kansas City Chiefs speaks to the media during Super Bowl LVIII Opening Night at Allegiant Stadium | Getty Images | Photo by Luke Hales

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The football season is coming to a close with the big game on the horizon. While several fans have already secured tickets for the Superbowl, there are still some who are looking to get in. However, the huge demand for Sunday's football match-up has triggered a dangerous wave of scams. Fraudsters are using advanced editing software and AI tools to scam the fans.



 

According to the managed intelligence company Nisos, scammers create fake tickets by using image editing software and generate documents mimicking legitimate tickets, such as receipts. They may use stolen or forged barcodes or QR codes to make the counterfeit tickets look authentic.

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Scammers then use social media platforms like X (formerly Twitter), Facebook, or Instagram to target victims. They may even leverage automation and potentially artificial intelligence to identify and target victims based on the language used in their posts.

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Nisos stated that it received messages from scammers on social media after creating posts with the buzzwords of Superbowl and commonly used hashtags such as #SuperBowl, #SuperBowlTickets, or #LookingForTickets.



 

In the messages, scammers claimed to have tickets to the Superbowl which they were selling at massive discounts. The messages further contained links to other platforms where the scammers attempted to finalize the sale of the counterfeit tickets. The most common platforms used for this were Facebook, Instagram, X, WhatsApp, Telegram, Cash App, Venmo, and Zelle, as per the Nisos analysis.



 

People offering massive discounts on the Superbowl tickets, such as 50% off or more right before the event may be trying to scam. If the offer looks “too good to be true” then maybe it is.

Further in the DMs, scammers may pretend to be real people with personal or professional issues that are preventing them from attending the event. These excuses range from a family emergency or a work conflict.

Scammers may also use pressure tactics to force the victims into making hasty decisions and paying for the tickets without verifying their authenticity.

Representative Image | Pexels | Photo by Monstera Production
Pexels | Photo by Monstera Production

The number one tip to avoid becoming a victim of a Superbowl counterfeit ticket scam is to avoid buying tickets through social media platforms. By not using the official channels, fans expose themselves to a high risk of getting scammed and losing money and a chance to enjoy the Superbowl.

If the offer on social media seems legitimate, fans should look out for signs that give away the scammers. In case someone is using pressure tactics and claiming that they have a limited number of tickets left with other customers in line, they may be trying to scam.

If they make emotional appeals or tricks to manipulate, they may be trying to scam as well. Fans are advised not to fall for the proof-of-purchase documents such as receipts offered by the scammers as these can be easily faked. The phrase, “name your price” is another major red flag, Nisos highlighted.

Before engaging with any potential seller on social media, fans are advised to thoroughly review the account’s recent history, as some scammers claim to be selling tickets to multiple high-profile events, at the same time. Thus, if someone is only selling tickets to various events on their social media account, they may turn out to be a scammer.

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