Sweden is Building the World's Largest Wooden City: Here's What We Know

Sweden is Building the World's Largest Wooden City: Here's What We Know
Cover Image Source: www.al.se

In recent years, the world of architecture has witnessed a remarkable transformation as wooden buildings have risen to new heights. From towering timber skyscrapers in Norway, Switzerland, and Australia to Singapore's largest timber building in Asia, the potential of wood as a construction material has captured the attention of developers and architects alike. Now, a groundbreaking project is set to redefine the limits of wooden construction. Real estate developer Atrium Ljungberg has announced plans to build the world's largest 'wooden city' in Stockholm, Sweden. This ambitious endeavor marks a significant milestone in the evolution of sustainable architecture and innovation.



 

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Named Stockholm Wood City, this groundbreaking development is set to become a beacon of wooden architecture on a global scale. With a sprawling expanse of 250,000 square meters (2.7 million square feet), the city will encompass 7,000 office spaces, 2,000 homes, as well as an array of restaurants and shops. According to the developers, Stockholm Wood City aims to create a vibrant urban environment that seamlessly blends workplaces, housing, and leisure facilities. This colossal undertaking is hailed as the "world's largest known construction project in wood."

Source: GettyImages | Jonas Gratzer  Stringer
Source: GettyImages | Jonas Gratzer Stringer

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The choice of location for Stockholm Wood City plays a pivotal role in its success. The project will take root in the vibrant neighborhood of Sickla, which already hosts over 400 companies. This thriving business hub provides a solid foundation for the wooden city to flourish. Atrium Ljungberg, the developer behind the project, envisions Sickla as a 'five-minute city,' where workplaces, homes, leisure facilities, and amenities are all within a short walk of one another. This interconnectedness fosters a sense of community and convenience, aligning with the principles of sustainable urban planning.

Source: www.al.se
Source: www.al.se

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Timber has emerged as a sustainable alternative to traditional construction materials like concrete and steel. The environmental benefits of timber construction are manifold. Firstly, timber acts as a "carbon sink," meaning that it stores carbon dioxide removed from the air by trees, mitigating its release into the atmosphere. This carbon sequestration potential makes wooden buildings a valuable tool in combating climate change. Moreover, wooden structures offer better indoor air quality and can be built with significantly lower carbon emissions compared to conventional materials. By embracing timber, Stockholm Wood City contributes to a greener future for urban development.

Source: GettyImages | Paula Bronstein  Staff
Source: GettyImages | Paula Bronstein Staff

While concerns about fire risks associated with wooden buildings have been raised, advocates argue that engineered timber, which will be extensively used in Stockholm Wood City, possesses safety measures that mitigate such risks. Engineered timber has a slower and more predictable burning rate than conventional steel structures, making it a viable and safe choice for large-scale construction. Moreover, adherence to stringent fire-proofing techniques ensures that the risk of fire is effectively managed. 

Source: GettyImages | Jonas Gratzer  Stringer
Source: GettyImages | Jonas Gratzer Stringer

The impact of the real estate industry on carbon emissions is undeniable, accounting for nearly 40% of global emissions, according to consulting firm McKinsey. With Stockholm Wood City, Atrium Ljungberg claims to set a new standard for sustainability and innovation in real estate development. By spearheading this groundbreaking project, they seek to inspire and catalyze change within the industry.

"Our industry leaves a big mark, and it is important for us to make a positive difference in both the shorter and longer term," emphasizes Annica Anaas, CEO of Atrium Ljungberg. Stockholm Wood City serves as a model for other developers, showcasing the immense potential of wooden construction in reducing carbon footprints and creating environmentally conscious communities.



 

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