William Barr
Source: Getty

Two-time U.S. attorney general William Barr's new book depicts his time working for both Trump and George H.W. Bush.

How Did Former U.S. Attorney General William Barr Make His Millions?

Kathryn Underwood - Author
By

Mar. 11 2022, Published 9:50 a.m. ET

Former U.S. Attorney General William Barr has a new book out this week detailing his years serving under two presidential administrations. He has criticized left-wing progressives but opposed former President Donald Trump's claims of election fraud in 2020. What is Barr's net worth, and how did he make his wealth?

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William Barr

Former U.S. Attorney General, Executive vice-president and General Counsel at Verizon

Net worth: $50 million

William P. Barr is perhaps best known for serving as the U.S. attorney general during the George H.W. Bush and Donald Trump administrations. He spent time working for the CIA, legal firms, and GTE Corporation (eventually Verizon). Barr advocated for Trump numerous times before and during his presidency but resigned after disagreeing with Trump on his claims of election fraud.

Birthdate: May 23, 1950

Education: Columbia University (B.A. and M.A.), George Washington University Law School (J.D.)

Spouse: Christine Moynihan

William Barr's net worth is estimated at $50 million.

CelebrityNetWorth estimates Barr's net worth at $50 million. Most of his wealth was made while working for Verizon. He also received $17 million in a company pension plan.

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William Barr was the 77th and 85th U.S. Attorney General.

After working for the CIA during the 1970s and for a law firm during much of the 1980s, Barr held several roles in the Department of Justice before becoming U.S. attorney general in 1991. He was the 77th U.S. attorney general and served during the George H.W. Bush administration. He pushed for higher incarceration rates and encouraged Bush to pardon officials involved in the Iran-Contra affair.

Trump and Barr
Source: Getty

Barr looks on as President Trump prepares to give a coronavirus briefing on April 1, 2020.

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As the attorney general for a second time to President Trump, Barr was a champion for Trump. He replaced Jeff Sessions in the role in 2019. During his term in the office, he wrote a letter regarding the Mueller report, intervened in convictions of former Trump advisers, ordered federal executions to resume, and worked on the Google antitrust lawsuit.

Barr resigned in December 2020, soon after the presidential election. Barr told Trump that his claims of election fraud were false.

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William Barr's new book describes his time as attorney general in detail.

Barr's memoir about his time as attorney general was published on March 8. In an NPR interview, Barr defends many of his actions as attorney general and restates that he criticized Trump for his false election fraud claims.

Barr still expresses a great deal of support for Trump and his policies but draws the line at the idea of election fraud. Barr suggests Trump might not be the best Republican candidate in 2024.

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William Barr
Source: Getty

William Barr announcing a crime reduction initiative in Detroit in 2019.

In a recent NBC News interview with Lester Holt, Barr defended his choices as attorney general. Barr said that he did what he believed was right, not just what the president wanted. For example, when Barr told the AP he found no evidence of sufficient fraud to impact the election's outcome, Trump questioned him on it.

According to Barr, Trump became angry and Barr offered to resign. He claims Trump said, "Go home. You're done." Trump hasn't backed up this account entirely.

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