10 Jun

How AT&T’s Streaming Prices Compare with Peers’

WRITTEN BY Sneha Nahata

Pricing of AT&T’s streaming services

AT&T’s (T) WarnerMedia’s planned streaming service is set to cost $16–$17 per month, somewhat pricey compared with other new over-the-top offerings. Disney’s streaming service, Disney+, is set to launch on November 12 and cost as low as $6.99 per month, and Comcast’s streaming product set to cost ~$12 per month for users who do not have a cable subscription. Netflix’s basic plan starts at $8.99 per month, Amazon Prime is available at $12.99 per month, HBO Now is available for $14.99 per month, and YouTube TV costs $49.99 per month. Apple has not disclosed its streaming service’s pricing.

How AT&T’s Streaming Prices Compare with Peers’

Movies and shows

WarnerMedia’s service is set to roll out in late 2019 and challenge established rivals Netflix and Amazon and new entrants Walt Disney, Apple, and Comcast’s NBCUniversal in the video-on-demand space with its content.

The AT&T-owned company, which includes HBO, Warner Bros., and the Turner family of cable channels, is expected to deliver a lineup of studio-driven movies and TV shows including Harry Potter, The Conjuring, and Game of Thrones. AT&T’s TNT holdings would add sci-fi and fantasy series such as Snowpiercer, The Alienist, and The Last Ship.

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