X
<

Will Oracle Position Itself as a Key Cloud Player in 2017?

PART:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Part 6
Will Oracle Position Itself as a Key Cloud Player in 2017? PART 6 OF 12

Will Oracle’s Bare Metal Cloud Move ahead of Amazon Web Services?

Oracle is targeting AWS with Oracle Bare Metal Cloud

Earlier in the series, we discussed how a temporary setback suffered by Amazon’s (AMZN) Amazon Web Services (or AWS) could provide a growth opportunity for its peers in the cloud space.

We also discussed Oracle’s (ORCL) twisting its licensing terms on AWS. This isn’t the first time Oracle has tried to position its cloud as a faster alternative to rival Amazon’s.

Will Oracle&#8217;s Bare Metal Cloud Move ahead of Amazon Web Services?

Interested in ORCL? Don't miss the next report.

Receive e-mail alerts for new research on ORCL

Success! You are now receiving e-mail alerts for new research. A temporary password for your new Market Realist account has been sent to your e-mail address.

Success! has been added to your Ticker Alerts.

Success! has been added to your Ticker Alerts. Subscriptions can be managed in your user profile.

In late 2016, Oracle launched the second generation of its IaaS (infrastructure-as-a-service) offering, Oracle Bare Metal Cloud. It’s a public cloud that provides bare physical servers on which customers have the flexibility to run their chosen software. It interoperates with current Oracle Cloud Platform services.

Oracle Bare Metal Cloud needs a special mention, as it’s the offering on which Oracle has laid its hopes of outdoing AWS.

On Oracle Bare Metal’s launch, Oracle’s CEO, Larry Ellison, stated, “Our Generation2 IaaS delivers twice the compute, twice the memory, four times the storage and ten times more I/O at a 20% lower price than Amazon Web Services.”

Bare Metal Cloud’s differentiating feature

Oracle Bare Metal Cloud could be a standout offering compared to AWS. Customers prefer its Docker container ecosystem when it comes to lessening the overhead of virtual machines.

Docker is an open-source software that works on container technology. It enables software developers to construct, test, and deploy software, and it packages together those essential components required to make an app or container work quickly.

Companies can then send these apps or containers to servers in cloud or corporate data centers anywhere in the world for wider deployment. Thus, Docker containers are looked upon by enterprises as ways to build software and compress more capacity more efficiently from their existing infrastructures.

X

Please select a profession that best describes you: