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Why Gilead’s Valuation Is Low Compared to Peers

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Part 3
Why Gilead’s Valuation Is Low Compared to Peers PART 3 OF 5

How Gilead’s HIV Drugs Portfolio Fared in 2016

Gilead’s portfolio  

Gilead’s (GILD) portfolio includes various drugs for key therapeutic areas including HIV/AIDS, liver disease, oncology, cardiovascular, inflammation, respiratory, and others. Over 90% of revenues come from antiviral product sales including the HIV/AIDS franchise and the liver disease franchise.

How Gilead’s HIV Drugs Portfolio Fared in 2016

How Gilead’s HIV Drugs Portfolio Fared in 2016

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HIV drugs portfolio  

The HIV drugs portfolio includes drugs like Truvada, Atripla, Stribild, Complera, Viread, Vitekta, and Tybost, and new drugs Genvoya, Descovy, Odefsey, and Emtriva. From these, key blockbuster drugs include Truvada, Atripla, Stribild, Complera, Viread, and Genvoya.

Truvada

Truvada is the largest-selling blockbuster drug from Gilead’s HIV franchise. Truvada is used in combination with other antiretroviral agents for the treatment of patients with HIV-1 infection and also used to reduce the risk of sexually acquired HIV-1 infection. Truvada reported revenues of $3.6 billion during 2016 as compared to $3.5 million for 2015.

Atripla

Atripla, another blockbuster drug from Gilead’s HIV franchise, is used alone as well as in combination with other antiretroviral agents for the treatment of patients with HIV-1 infection. Atripla reported a decline in revenues at $2.6 billion for 2016 as compared to $3.1 billion for 2015.

Stribild

Stribild, another blockbuster drug from Gilead’s HIV franchise, is used for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in patients with no antiretroviral treatment history. It’s also used to replace existing antiretroviral treatment in patients who are virologically suppressed on a stable antiretroviral for more than six months with no treatment failure and no reported resistance to Stribild. Stribild revenues rose to $1.9 million for 2016 as compared to $1.8 million for 2015.

Stribild competes with GlaxoSmithKline’s (GSK) Tivicay. Other drugs include Bristol-Myers Squibb’s (BMY) Evotaz, Johnson & Johnson’s (JNJ) Prezcobix, and Merck’s (MRK) Isentress.

To divest the risk, investors can consider ETFs like the Vanguard Healthcare ETF (VHT), which holds ~3.1% of its total assets in Gilead Sciences.

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